Charles Louis Davis and Samuel Wesley Thompson DVM Foundation

For the Advancement of Veterinary and Comparative Pathology

info@cldavis.org | Phone: 847-367-4359 | Fax: 847-247-1869

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  • SPECIES:
    • CANINE
  • SYSTEM:
    • RESPIRATORY
  • ORGAN:
    • LARYNX
  • DIAGNOSIS:
    • LARYNGEAL RHABDOMYOSARCOMA
  • CONTRIBUTOR:
    • LUONG
  • INSTITUTION:
    • THE ANIMAL MEDICAL CENTER
  • GENPATH:
    • NEOPLASIA
  • COMMENTS:
    • Rhabdomyomas and rhabdomyosarcomas are neoplasms of striated muscle. In humans and domestic animals, rhabdomyomas occur less commonly than their malignant counterparts. Striated muscle neoplasms can be divided into two main groups (cardiac and extra-cardiac) based on anatomical location. Cardiac striated muscle neoplasms are rare. Cardiac rhabdomyomas have been reported mostly in young animals in pigs, sheep, cattle, dogs and a fallow deer.1,2,3 There is a general consensus that cardiac rhabdomyomas represent a congenital developmental abnormality (i.e., hamartoma) of cardiac muscle.1,2,3 Cardiac rhabdomyosarcomas are extremely rare, and there are only a few cases reported in dogs.1 Since mature cardiac muscle does not retain the capacity for cell division under normal conditions, cardiac rhabdomyosarcomas are thought to arise from undifferentiated mesenchymal cells in the heart that retain the capacity to differentiate into striated muscle.