Charles Louis Davis and Samuel Wesley Thompson DVM Foundation

For the Advancement of Veterinary and Comparative Pathology

info@cldavis.org | Phone: 847-367-4359 | Fax: 847-247-1869

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Image: F30209

Pathology Image
  • SPECIES:
    • CANINE
  • SYSTEM:
    • INTEGUMENT
  • ORGAN:
    • SKIN
  • DIAGNOSIS:
    • COLOR MUTANT ALOPECIA
  • CONTRIBUTOR:
    • WILLIAMS
  • INSTITUTION:
    • Armed Forces Institute of Pathology
  • GENPATH:
    • DYSPLASIA, dysplastic/ALOPECIA
  • COMMENTS:
    • Uncommon hereditary skin disease of dogs with color-diluted coats (blue, fawn). Most common in Doberman Pinschers (57.9% blue; 89.5% fawn), but also reported in other breeds as well. This condition is limited to color-diluted hair (diluted black or brown areas), with sparing of white and tan areas. There is often bilaterally symmetrical alopecia, most commonly truncal, with a dry, dull, poor-quality haircoat. Secondary bacterial folliculitis is a common sequelae. Color dilution alopecia is based on autosomal recessive gene transmission; the dilution gene -d, especially the allele -d1 may play an important role in the genetic transmission of color mutant alopecia. Dilute hairs have large pigment granules (macromelanosomes), likely due to abnormal melanin transfer and storage. Dilute hairs contain as much or more melanin than their normal counterparts.